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Installing the Exchange 5.5 Event Service

Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting and Routing engine is installed as part of the Microsoft Exchange Event Service with the setup of the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5. This only happens if you are installing the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 on a new machine. If you are running an update from a previous version of Microsoft Exchange Server 4.x/5.x only existing components are updated. The Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Routing Engine is only installed with Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Service Pack 1 (note that an updated version is included with Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Service Pack 2).

You can check if Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting and Routing is installed, by opening the Control Panel applet, choose Services and search for an entry called Microsoft Exchange Event Service. You can also start the Microsoft Exchange 5.5 admin program and select System Folders\Events Root\EventsConfig_<Your Server Name> in the left-hand pane. If you cannot see the system folder or the service is not listed at the Control Panel applet, the event service is not installed properly and you must run the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 setup program to add the service.

To install Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting and Routing, start the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 setup program again, choose Add/Remove, select Microsoft Exchange Server, choose Change options and select  the Exchange Event Service. You will be asked for a Windows NT account, which should be used to run this service. The easiest way is to use the same Windows NT account, which is used as the Microsoft Exchange service account. There are some security issues, because the Microsoft Exchange service account can access all information of the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 information store and directory. For more information about security, please take a look at The Secrets of Exchange Server Scripting and Routing, Permissions and Security.

Note that if you are adding the Exchange Event Service after the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Service Pack 1 (or higher) is installed, you must re-apply the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Service Pack 1 (or higher).

Installing the Exchange 5.5 Routing Engine

With Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Service Pack 1 (or higher), Microsoft has introduced a new feature called Microsoft Exchange Server Routing Engine used for simple workflow solutions. During the installation of Microsoft Exchange Server 5,5 Service Pack 1 (or higher), the components are installed to the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 automatically, if the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Event Service is already installed. Otherwise you have to run the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 setup program, add the Event Service and re-apply the Microsoft Exchange Server Service Pack 1 (or higher).

Create a Routing Script

You must use the Microsoft Exchange Routing Wizard to create Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Routing Scripts or the Agent Editor, which is included at the MSDN October 98, Platform SDK Update. The source code of the agent editor is available at the Microsoft Exchange Application Downloads Highlights or at the CDOLive Code Sample Library (see Microsoft Sample Applications). For more information about Microsoft Exchange Application Downloads Highlights, please take a look at Links @ Microsoft. However, you cannot use Microsoft Outlook 9x/2000 to create and modify a routing script.

The Microsoft Exchange Routing Wizard is included in the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Service Pack 1 (or higher) and must be installed separately on each machine, where you want to build Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Routing scripts. Also, it requires that Microsoft Outlook 9x/2000 is installed properly on the same machine. You can find the Microsoft Exchange Routing Wizard on the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Service Pack 1 (or higher) CD-ROM at the Eng\Server\Support\Collab\Sampler\Routing directory. It is also included at the SP1_55SS.EXE  (resp. SP2_55SS.EXE for Service Pack 2) file, which is available for download from the Microsoft FTP Server.

The Microsoft Exchange Routing Wizard is a sample application, written in Microsoft Visual Basic, that illustrates the type of routing tools that can be built easily with the Microsoft Exchange Routing Objects. With the Microsoft Exchange Routing Wizard, you can define and install simple sequential or parallel routing and approval logic into Microsoft Exchange Server folders. Once installed, these folders will automatically route any items they receive, according to the route you defined. The Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 will automatically track the progress of the item being routed, including handling of overdue items.

The source code of the Routing Wizard is available at the Microsoft Exchange Application Downloads Highlights or at the CDOLive Code Sample Library (see Microsoft Sample Applications). For more information about Microsoft Exchange Application Downloads Highlights, please take a look at Links @ Microsoft.

Create and Edit a Scripting Agent Script

To create and edit Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting Agent scripts, you can use the standard editor provided with Microsoft Outlook 97 8.03 (or later) or Microsoft Outlook 98/2000. Microsoft Visual Studio 97 includes a macro which can be used with Microsoft Outlook 97 8.03 to edit agent scripts. But after installing Microsoft Outlook 98/2000 this macro does not work any longer. This is a known issue and there is no workaround available.

Microsoft released an Agent Editor with MSDN October 98, Platform SDK Update. You can use this agent editor to create and manage Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting and Routing scripts without using Microsoft Outlook 9x/2000. The source code of the agent editor is available at the Microsoft Exchange Application Downloads Highlights or at the CDOLive Code Sample Library (see Microsoft Sample Applications). For more information about Microsoft Exchange Application Download Highlights, please take a look at Links @ Microsoft.

If you are not able to see the Agents tab in Microsoft Outlook 97 8.03 (or later) or Microsoft Outlook 98/2000 make sure that you have the appropriate permissions to create and edit Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting Agent scripts. For more information, please take a look at The Secrets of Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting and Routing, Permissions and Security.

Also make sure that you have enabled the Server Scripting add-on in the add-in manager of Microsoft Outlook 98/2000. Otherwise the Agents tab will not be shown if you have the appropriate permissions. To check if the Server Scripting add-on is enabled, start Microsoft Outlook 98/2000 and select Tools, Options, choose Other, click Advanced Options and Add-In Manager. Search the list for Server Scripting. Note that this add-on is only available if you have installed Microsoft Outlook 98/2000 in Corporate or Workgroup mode.

Under some circumstances it could be possible that the Microsoft Outlook profile becomes corrupt. To fix that, start Control Panel, Mail, remove and re-create your profile.

Each script is stored as a hidden item in that folder where you have installed the Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting and Routing script. These scripts are only visible through the Agents tab in Microsoft Outlook 97 8.03 (or later) or Microsoft Outlook 98/2000 or through a MAPI utility like MDBVU32.EXE, which is included on the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 CD-ROM.

Using Microsoft Outlook 9x/2000 you have a Copy button on the Agents tab. According to the Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 documentation you can use this button to copy Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting and Routing scripts between folders. However, this is not possible. You can only copy existing scripts at the same folder. This seems to be a bug in the documentation.

Also Microsoft currently does not provide a way to move a Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting and Routing script from one folder to another using the Microsoft Exchange admin program or Microsoft Outlook 9x/2000. However, it is possible to accomplish that by creating your own Microsoft Visual Basic Application to move (in fact delete at the old location and re-create it at the new location) the script programmatically.

There is also an excellent third party add-on from Micro Eye, called Script Director, which provide rich functions to maintain Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting and Routing scripts. For more information, please take a look at the Links @ the World.

Publishing a Scripting and Routing Script Programmatically

Another way to publish a Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting and Routing script is doing it programmatically. Authoring tools built with Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Routing Engine require this capability in order to register the Microsoft Exchange Server Routing Engine as an event handler for a particular folder.

Microsoft accomplish that by including the Event Service Configuration Library within Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5. This library exposes interfaces to create and bind Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 Scripting and Routing scripts programmatically.

For more information about publishing a Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting Agent script programmatically, please take a look at The Secrets of Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting and Routing, Event Service Configuration Library.