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Permissions and Security

In order to use Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting and Routing scripts it is important to take a look at the permissions, which are required to run a script properly. Because you can call any Component Object Model (COM) object from your script, you must also take care about the Windows NT permissions.

The Microsoft Exchange Scripting Agent creates a CDO session based on the mailbox identity of the last Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting Agent script editor. This means that the Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting Agent script has the same Microsoft Exchange Server permissions as the Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting Agent script editor when accessing objects within the CDO session.

Typically, the Microsoft Exchange Scripting Agent runs on the Microsoft Exchange Server service account, whose Windows NT permissions match those of the Microsoft Exchange Server services. This means that the Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting Agent has the same power on the system as Microsoft Exchange Server itself. The Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting Agent can, for example, open any recipient's mailbox. In fact, it does open the mailbox of the script author, in order to determine that person's Microsoft Exchange Server identity.

After the Microsoft Exchange Server Event Service is installed and started properly, permissions must be assigned to a particular mailbox to allow it to create and edit Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting and Routing scripts. Use the Microsoft Exchange admin program to add a particular mailbox to the hidden system folder Folders\System Folders\Events Root\EventConfig_<Your Servername> with Author (or higher) permissions to make sure that this mailbox can create and edit Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting and Routing scripts.

If you don't see the folder Folders\System Folders\Events Root\EventConfig_<Your Servername> in the Microsoft Exchange admin program, it is possible that the Microsoft Exchange Event Service is not installed or you are not running Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5. For more information please take a look at The Secrets of Exchange Server Scripting and Routing, Installation.

Also, you must have the Owner permission to a particular public folder to see the Agents tab in the folder properties dialog. Otherwise you cannot create and edit Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting and Routing scripts in a particular public folder. Use the Microsoft Exchange admin program or Microsoft Outlook to add a mailbox or distribution list to this folder.

After these steps are finished you should be able to see the Agents tab in the properties of a particular public folder. You can now start to create and edit your Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting and Routing script.

Note that these changes sometimes only take affect after you reboot the Microsoft Exchange Server.

If you don't see the Agents tab in the Microsoft Outlook client, it is possible that you do not use the correct version of Microsoft Outlook, or the Server Scripting add-on is not installed. For more information please take a look at The Secrets of Exchange Server Scripting and Routing, Installation.